Why we don't know exactly what happened during a near-collision in space - News Summed Up

Why we don't know exactly what happened during a near-collision in space


New York (CNN Business) Space traffic experts tracked two pieces of orbital garbage that appeared to be careening toward each other on Thursday night: a defunct Soviet satellite and a discarded Chinese rocket booster. LeoLabs, which uses its own ground-based radars to track spaceborne objects, put the odds of collision at 10% or greater. That's high, but not uncommon, LeoLabs CEO Daniel Ceperley told CNN Business on Thursday. But the US military, which uses data from the world's largest network of radars and telescopes, said that its space traffic control team detected a "nearly zero percent probability of collision." In response, LeoLabs's Ceperley said in a statement Friday morning: "We obviously have a great deal of respect for the [US military's] 18th Space Control Squadron and their estimates.


Source: CNN October 16, 2020 21:56 UTC



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