The old grey matter has served me well

The bestselling book — which begins: “I often have to cut into the brain and it is something I hate doing”— is blisteringly honest about his mistakes as well as his successes during his career. Born in 1950, Marsh read philosophy, politics and economics at Oxford, although he dropped out for a year to work as a hospital porter. After returning to Oxford and graduating with a first-class degree, he studied medicine at the Royal Free Hospital in London. He decided to specialise in neurosurgery after witnessing an operation on a woman with a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. “It was love at first sight,”…

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

Take note: it’s too soon to say a final farewell to cash

There are many ways to pay, but notes and coins remain quick, easy and reliable. Indeed, cash is still the most popular payment method, accounting for nearly 50% of transactions, according to Payments UK. The trade association predicts that debit card payments will overtake cash in 2021. However, the unreliability of recent expert predictions — note the lack of victory parties for Hillary Clinton and “remain” voters — suggests that cash could remain king for far longer. Notes and coins also do not have the “hangover effect” — that awful feeling you get when your monthly card bills arrive.

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

Tech firms: make it easier for migrants

Britain’s digital tech sector faces a critical shortage of talent unless the government changes immigration rules, says a new report to be published on Tuesday. The Coalition for a Digital Economy (Coadec), a policy group representing tech start-ups, warns that current immigration rules will leave an 800,000 shortfall in digital talent by 2020. The report found that the sector — hailed as a key to post-Brexit prosperity by Theresa May — relies heavily on non-UK citizens. One third of the first 10 workers recruited by tech companies are from outside the country. At the moment, key workers such as software engineers have to…

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

Just as the debate looks over, here comes Tony

I’ve got a right to speak and you’ve got a right to listen — or not.” Perhaps not. Seconds after Tony Blair’s speech on Europe the foreign secretary attacked him for the Iraq War (which Boris Johnson MP voted for in 2003) and urged the nation to turn off the television when the former prime minister appears. Iain Duncan Smith chided Blair for showing contempt for democracy and was echoed by a source close to Jeremy Corbyn. An angry response from Brexiteers was just what he was hoping to provoke. He wants to keep the public debate alive so that Brexit will not mean Brexit automatically on the terms dictated by the prime minister, which…

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

How to lose friends and procreate people

If you haven’t seen Catastrophe, the Channel 4 sitcom in which pandemonium in the shape of two children under the age of three is unleashed into the lives of accidental couple Sharon and Rob, then here is a scene that sums it up best. It happens in series two, some time after Sharon, a striking, no-nonsense Irish Londoner, first hooks up with Rob, a handsome, horny American over in London for a week-long business trip. And long after Sharon discovers she’s pregnant, Rob comes back to “make the best of it”, they fall in love, get hitched and settle down to domestic Armageddon. Now it is 7.15am on the morning of their third anniversary and they are in bed — their first “lie-in” since having their…

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC



The Google Express for Crewe is leaving from platform 2

Thomas the search engine: how Google might like to dress up its trains ALAMYTechnology giants including Google and Uber could help to run the new HS2 train service under radical plans being explored by Whitehall. The transport department is trying to tempt the digital pioneers into buying minority stakes in a franchise that will serve the £55bn north-south high-speed line. Ministers and mandarins are trying to tap into a wide range of innovators, ranging from online retailers to digital spin-outs. They want them as investors, not just suppliers, according to three industry sources. They hope to tempt the cash-rich companies to buy stakes…

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

11 stabbed every day as knife crime soars

More than 11 serious stabbings happen every day in England, according to new figures that show knife crime has risen more dramatically than had been thought. Data from hospitals reveal a 13% rise in the number of people admitted with stab wounds compared with the previous 12 months. More than 4,000 victims of knife attacks were hospitalised between May 2015 and April 2016. The rise in serious stabbings, reported by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), is greater than the 11% increase in knife crime recorded by police, which includes less serious offences such as possession. The figures provide yet more evidence of a knife crime epidemic and will lead to calls for fresh measures.

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

IMI’s trouble with big, hairy audacious goals

Mark Selway said he would double IMI’s operating profits by 2019. The clock is ticking REX/SHUTTERSTOCKThe problem with targets is they have a nasty habit of coming back to bite you. IMI’s Mark Selway must be ruing the day he pledged to double the engineer’s operating profits by 2019. That was in the summer of 2014, eight months after Selway took over as chief executive of the Birmingham valve maker. It is important to set “big hairy audacious goals”, said Selway, promptly setting a goal of £600m of operating profits by 2019.

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

Battle of the theme parks: Orlando v Dubai

Set to stun: saving the world from aliens on the Men in Black rise at Universal Studios, OrlandoIf you wanted a warm, family-fun-packed break with the kids, Orlando was always the obvious choice. In the past 12 months, Dubai has opened not one but four theme parks — so how do the rivals stack up? Dubai’s unofficial motto is “if you can imagine it, Dubai can build it”. To find out which of these playgrounds offers you the best all-round holiday experience, I went to both. The vibeOrlando When Walt Disney World opened in 1971, people weren’t in search of luxury.

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

Past success is no guarantee — right, Usain?

Usain Bolt remained ahead of the pack at Rio 2016 — after proving his superiority at the London and Beijing Games AP:Associated PressCall me cynical, but I don’t believe the warning that regulators force fund managers to chant: “Past performance is not a guide to the future.” I don’t think the regulators believe it either. If they did, they wouldn’t ask potential staff for references, would they? While it is absurd to assume that last year’s top-performing fund will necessarily be this year’s winner, consistent outperformance over the medium term gives a reason to hope that success might be sustained. Just look at Usain Bolt, who made history in Rio last year when he won 100m and 200m gold for his third consecutive Olympic Games. That’s why Money asked the independent researcher FundCalibre to scrutinise unit trust managers’ performance over the past five years to identify the…

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

Start-up accelerator provides spark for 3,000 jobs

Founders under the wing of Entrepreneurial Spark, the world’s largest free accelerator for small businesses, have created more than 3,000 jobs. In its latest “Impact Report”, to be published this week, Entrepreneurial Spark will reveal that it has helped to create 3,152 jobs since its launch in 2012. The accelerator puts small businesses through their paces at a dozen hubs around the country, from Belfast to Brighton. This year it will set up a fintech accelerator at its home in Royal Bank of Scotland’s Gogarburn headquarters near Edinburgh. This will be Entrepreneurial Spark’s biggest hub yet with 100 seats.

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

Highlights from the new range at Argos

The Heart of House range at Argos includes well-priced staples for every room. Highlights include the Discovery bedding set and classic sofas such as this Sherbourne three-seater, upholstered in duck egg blue (£690). argos.co.ukDropping in the next few weeks is this gem of a vase range by Jasper Conran for Debenhams. From left, clear optic vase, smoke optic vase, taupe conical vase, tall blue optic vase, green oval ombre vase, blue conical vase, green bud vase and dark smoke bud vase. £15-£75; debenhams.comTurner and Harper specialises in beautiful brushes, handmade from hog bristles and…

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

Macron marches on liberal Londres

More than 3,000 people will attend an event at Central Hall in Westminster organised by his grassroots campaign En Marche! ), many of them Millennials who see the former economy minister as the only candidate who can rejuvenate France. “He is a man of vision,” said Aladin Benas-Beaurain, 25, who moved to London three years ago and works in a French bank. “He is not surfing on dogma. He is bringing fresh air to the French political framework.”Macron, 39, has captured the enthusiasm of young and disillusioned voters with his pledge of a modernising “revolution”…

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

Hotels reflect on investment strategy

After several years of virtually no capital expenditure on Ireland’s existing hotel stock, hoteliers are back in investment mode. According to John Hughes, head of transactions in CBRE’s hotels and licensed division, operators typically set aside about 3% of revenue each year for fixtures, fittings and equipment. “That would cover a lot of the day-to-day refurbishment that would be required,” he said. The general norm is to refurbish hotel bedrooms and public areas every seven years or so to maintain the overall investment and to ensure facilities continue to look fresh and up-to-date. “One of the issues between 2008 and 2012 was that a number of hotels were in receivership,” said Hughes.

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC

Great British Breaks: Wensleydale

But in addition to its dairy delights, this valley in the Yorkshire Dales has crumbling castles, waterfalls, market towns and cosy pubs. What to doThe 26-mile valley stretches from the medieval market town of Hawes to Masham along the River Ure. Hawes is home to the Wensleydale Creamery. Naturally, it also has a cheesemonger, where you can scoff 20-odd varieties of Wensleydale, including pineapple and limoncello. The restaurant makes a cracking Yorkshire rarebit with Wensleydale and Black Sheep ale (mains from £8.95; wensleydale.co.uk).

February 19, 2017 00:02 UTC



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