Bookmakers had told an undercover journalist that they would sell details of rigged periods of play in the third Ashes Test Will Russell/Getty ImagesThe International Cricket Council says there is “no evidence” of match-fixing in the third Ashes Test. The Sun reported this morning that two bookmakers had told an undercover journalist that they would sell details of rigged periods of play in the third Test. The pair asked for up to £140,000 to spot-fix events such as the exact number of runs in a particular over. The Sun reported that the bookmakers did not name any England players in connection with fixing, but did name players of other nationalities with whom they had worked. The newspaper handed over a dossier of their investigation to the ICC anti-corruption unit who released a statement last night.

December 14, 2017 00:20 UTC

Kirsty Brimelow, QCWhat if the world order was entirely different? It is a dystopian fiction where girls have the power to kill with a single touch. The world starts to realign: victims of trafficking overthrow their traffickers, oppressed women in the Middle East burn society’s chains and all-female armies are formed to make use of their deadly weapons. Men experience what it is like to live in a world controlled by women, but with an underlying narrative that people do bad stuff because, well, they can. If governance in America in 2017 left you somewhere between laughter and horror, pick up Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance.

December 14, 2017 00:04 UTC

Supreme CourtPublished: December 14, 2017Regina (HC) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and OthersBefore Baroness Hale of Richmond, Lord Clarke of Stone-cum-Ebony, Lord Wilson, Lord Sumption and Lord Carnwath[2017] UKSC 73Judgment November 15, 2017Although, under European Union law, a member state could not refuse to grant a right of residence to a non-EU national who was the primary carer of a dependent EU citizen child if the refusal would mean that the child was deprived of his EU citizenship rights by having to move out of the EU, the entitlement to state benefits of such carers was a matter for the member state concerned. The Supreme Court so held, dismissing the appeal of the claimant, HC, from…

December 14, 2017 00:04 UTC

A destitute, homeless man has enjoyed an upturn in his fortunes after stumbling on an unlocked cash depot at a Paris airport and walking away with €300,000. The man, aged about 50, is thought to have been looking for food in rubbish bins at Charles de Gaulle airport when he tried the door of the premises of Loomis, the cash handling company, according to detectives who have studied CCTV footage. The footage shows him entering the depot at 5.20pm last Friday and emerging minutes later with two bags of cash. Le Parisien, the daily newspaper, said that they contained a total of €300,000. The man can be seen walking away with the bags, leaving his old suitcase containing his…

December 14, 2017 00:04 UTC

Lord Pannick represented Gina Miller last year in her Supreme Court case, arguing successfully that ministers had to consult parliament before triggering Brexit Dan Kitwood/Getty ImagesJudges fear being dragged into political controversy by provisions in the Brexit bill that allow them to take account of rulings of the European Court of Justice after the UK leaves, a QC has warned. The EU Withdrawal Bill makes clear that domestic courts will no longer be bound by new ECJ rulings after Brexit. Where appropriate, however, they will be able to consider the court’s findings on EU laws which have been “retained” by the UK. Lord Pannick, a crossbench peer and barrister, warned that this could expose judges to political challenges from both supporters and critics of the EU and suggested it may be better to state that UK courts should normally follow the judgments of the ECJ. Lord Pannick told the Lords…

December 14, 2017 00:04 UTC





David Cameron says Donald Trump’s “fake news” attacks on news broadcasters are dangerous Jack Hill for The Times; Evan Vucci/APDonald Trump’s attacks on the media are undermining western democracy and facilitating Russia’s attempts to spread anti-western propaganda, David Cameron has said. In his first public speech in the UK since leaving office last year, the former prime minister said the US president’s “fake news” attacks on news broadcasters were dangerous and helped deflect scrutiny away from President Putin. “When Donald Trump uses the term ‘fake news’ to describe CNN and the BBC, that is not just a questionable political tactic. It’s actually dangerous,” Mr Cameron told a conference organised by the anti-corruption agency Transparency International last night. Issuing a direct rebuke, Mr Cameron added: “President Trump, fake news is not broadcasters criticising you, it’s Russian bots and trolls targeting your democracy, pumping out untrue…

December 14, 2017 00:02 UTC

Denis O’Brien has named Declan Ganley as the client behind the dossier that he alleges was created and circulated to damage him and his telecommunications company’s reputation. On Monday Mr O’Brien’s lawyers filed affidavits from Colm Keaveney, a former Fianna Fáil TD, and Johnny Fallon, a political consultant, in which the two men link Mr Ganley with Red Flag, the PR company that Mr O’Brien has been suing for alleged conspiracy and defamation since 2015. The former TD has also alleged that Karl Brophy, Red Flag’s founder, arranged for a senior Department of Finance official to meet Micheál Martin, the Fianna Fáil leader, in 2015 to discuss a Dáil debate on the sale of Siteserv to Mr O’Brien. He also alleged that he was sent…

December 14, 2017 00:02 UTC

Tokyo A court has ruled that a nuclear reactor in southwestern Japan should not operate because it is too close to a volcano and could be affected by an eruption. The injunction, ordered by the Hiroshima high court, is likely to force the reactor at the Ikata plant in Ehime prefecture to stay offline until after an inspection ends in February. Mount Aso is 78 miles from the plant. (AP)No Russian empires here, says the GambiaBanjul The Gambia has denied it has agreed a deal with a Russian politician who wants to revive the Romanov empire by building a new city in the West African state. The Gambian presidency said a document suggesting it supported the scheme by Anton Bakov, who casts himself…

December 14, 2017 00:02 UTC

Women get progressively happier in retirement — possibly because so many are widowed by then Jas Lehal for The TimesWomen are more miserable than men for almost their entire lives and are happier only after the age of 85, according to a large NHS survey. It found that women get progressively happier in retirement before overtaking men in their ninth decade. Growing numbers of Britons are reporting consistent unhappiness, the Health Survey for England found, with women more likely to report severe problems at almost every age. Twenty-eight per cent of women aged 16-24 have mental health problems bad enough to count as a disorder, compared with 16 per cent of men, the survey of 8,000 people found. While the gender gap narrows between 25 and 34, when 18 per cent…

December 14, 2017 00:02 UTC

These Aberdeen players can insist that they were not affected by speculation linking Derek McInnes with a move to Rangers all they like, but this was their second consecutive win since their manager confirmed that he was staying at Pittodrie. Not since the beginning of October — before Pedro Caixinha was sacked at Ibrox — had Aberdeen won successive fixtures, but they followed up last Friday’s narrow win at Dundee with a professional performance in Perth. McInnes made two changes from the side which won at Dens Park, with Stevie May and Kari Arnason replacing Frank Ross and Andrew Considine. The change in personnel meant a different shape for the visitors, with McInnes setting his players up in a 4-2-4 formation. It looked unorthodox and…

December 14, 2017 00:02 UTC

The NHS needs to hire 190,000 extra frontline staff or embrace radical reform, the health training body says Peter Byrne/PAMillennials’ reluctance to work full-time is contributing to a workforce crisis that will require the National Health Service to hire 190,000 extra frontline staff or embrace radical reform, the health training body says. Computer diagnosis will be needed to avoid having to hire so many extra staff and to prevent shortages growing worse, according to the first NHS staffing plan in 25 years. In addition, Health Education England says, less-trained doctors’ assistants must be able to prescribe drugs in order to treat ever rising numbers of elderly patients. There are more than 40,000 nursing vacancies in the NHS and a shortage of trained staff has become one of the biggest problems facing the health service. Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, acknowledged that a “short-termist” approach…

December 14, 2017 00:02 UTC

Brendan Rodgers last night hailed Olivier Ntcham’s progress at Celtic as the French under-21 international fired the champions’ opening goal in their win over Hamilton Academical. “He is developing very well,” said Rodgers of Ntcham. He’s got really good technique, good pace, good awareness. Olivier is now getting consistency and getting used to the number of games here. He is adapting and you saw his quality tonight.”Rodgers also paid his respect to the Celtic fans who turned out…

December 14, 2017 00:02 UTC

Julian Smith was a nervous man. Would Christmas come early to the government whips’ office or was the new chief whip about to prove himself a turkey? You’d better watch out, Mr Smith warned Tory MPs, and you’d better not cry. As MP after MP expressed cautious support for the amendment moved by Mr Grieve (Beaconsfield) to ensure a vote on the Brexit deal, Father Christmas was seen in Central Lobby. On his way to a children’s party, apparently, but if Mr Smith got his numbers wrong then it might be him who got the sack.

December 14, 2017 00:02 UTC

Aung San Suu Kyi signed the roll of honour in 2012 after her release MAXWELL’S/PAAung San Suu Kyi was last night stripped of the freedom of Dublin by councillors over her failure to stop the persecution of the Rohingya, Burma’s religious minority. Councillors voted by an overwhelming majority to strike the name of the Burmese leader and Nobel peace prize-winner from the city’s roll of honour, after Bob Geldof and U2, other holders of the freedom of the city, asked them to do so. The council also voted by 33 votes to 7 with 5 abstentions to remove Bob Geldof from the list. The singer travelled to Dublin last month to hand back his scroll in protest over Ms Suu Kyi’s actions. Several councillors criticised Mr Geldof’s gesture as a publicity stunt.

December 14, 2017 00:02 UTC

This was a scandal of the first order. In September, about 750 private patients received compensation in a group settlement costing Paterson’s insurers, and the private hospitals where he worked, £37 million in damages. On top of that an earlier action secured compensation for a further 270 patients who were treated by Paterson on the NHS. The majority of the claims related to negligent cancer care. Specifically, patients without cancer were subjected to unnecessary procedures, while those who were affected…

December 14, 2017 00:02 UTC