Highways and Byways: The Shinto past of a Buddhist shrine - News Summed Up

Highways and Byways: The Shinto past of a Buddhist shrine


The KMT’s animosity toward Japan was understandable given Japanese aggression and wartime atrocities when it ruled Taiwan as a colony from 1895 to 1945. One landmark given a Japanese-to-Han makeover years before the rupture in Tokyo-Taipei relations is Bilian Temple (碧蓮寺) in Fengtian (豐田), part of Hualien County’s Shoufeng Township (壽豐鄉). The first batch of Japanese settlers arrived in what the colonial regime dubbed Toyota (豐田 in Japanese script, hence “Fengtian” 豐田 in Chinese) in 1913. A Shinto shrine was consecrated in 1915 and dedicated to the Three Kami Deities of Cultivation (開拓三神), a trio of gods commonly worshiped in frontier regions of the Japanese Empire. The prince caught malaria and died near Tainan, after which he was elevated to a kami venerated by Shintoists.


Source: Taipei Times January 10, 2019 15:56 UTC



Loading...

Loading...